Burke Dispassionately Considered

Carl B. Cone, Burke and the Nature of Politics: The Age of the French Revolution, Lexington (University of Kentucky Press), 1964, 527 pages, $9. The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Vol. IV (July 1778–June 1782), ed. John A. Woods, Chicago (University of Chicago...

Burke and the Principle of Order

What Matthew Arnold called “an epoch of concentration” seems to be impending over the English-speaking world. The revolutionary impulses and the social enthusiasms which have dominated this era since their great explosion in Russia are now confronted with a...

Edmund Burke and the Constitution

Constitutions are something more than lines written upon parchment. When a written constitution endures—and most written constitutions have not been long for this world—that document has been derived successfully from long-established customs, beliefs, statutes, and...

Edmund Burke and the Future of American Politics

“We are at the beginning of great troubles.”Once upon a time it was the assumption of most of the people in the world that the fundamental constitutions of their society would endure to the end of time; or at least for a very great while; or certainly for the lifetime...

Why Edmund Burke Is Studied

To resist the idyllic imagination and the diabolical imagination, we need to know the moral imagination of Edmund Burke.Cato the Elder told his friends, “I had rather that men should ask, ‘Why is there no monument to Cato?’ than that they should ask, ‘Why is there a...

Burke and Natural Rights

Edmund Burke was at once a chief exponent of the Ciceronian doctrine of natural law and a chief opponent of the “rights of man.” In our time, which is experiencing simultaneously a revival of interest in natural-law theory and an enthusiasm for defining “human rights”...

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