On What Knowledge Pertains To

On Essays and Letters In tightly reasoned and intricate books, especially those of great writers, we find short segments that we do well to spell out as short essays of our own. A thing is never ours unless we state it, articulate it. The great Platonic teaching is...

The Dark Ages of the Enlightenment

The Brave New World of the Enlightenment by Louis I. Bredvold. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1961. 164 pp. Fifteen years ago, Louis I. Bredvold noted that Carl Becker’s The Heavenly City of the Eighteenth-Century Philosophers needed badly to be rewritten....

Significance and Missteps

Chesterton and the Romance of Orthodoxy: The Making of GKC, 1874–1908 by William Oddie. Oxford University Press (Oxford) ix + 401 pp., $50.00 cloth, $29.95 paper, 2008. The poet David Jones once called one’s formative period “the years of becoming.” William Oddie...

Wilhelm Roepke and the ‘Third Road’

The enormous span of Wilhelm Roepke’s interests and writings complicates the task of doing justice to his thought within the confines of an essay. Hence, I have elected to focus on just one aspect of his approach and of his philosophy, but one that has proved to be...

Democracy’s Immoderate Friends

A conversation with Daniel J. Mahoney. The University Bookman is pleased to present this interview with Daniel J. Mahoney, Professor of Political Science at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts, and author of a recent book, The Conservative Foundations of...

Subscribe to the University Bookman